Skip to main content

Ralph Lauren & Central Park: A 50 Year Love Affair

Ralph Lauren


Ralph Lauren will be celebrating the 50th anniversary of his company at Bethesda Terrace in Central Park during New York Fashion Week. 

The fashion show and dinner, scheduled for September 7, will benefit the Central Park Conservancy, a private nonprofit organization dedicated to restoring and maintaining the beloved New York City park.



In 1967, the Ralph Lauren Corporation got off the ground by exclusively selling men’s ties. In 1971, it launched a line of tailored shirts for women that featured the now famous polo player emblem. By 1977, it introduced its signature cotton mesh Polo shirt in various colors.

Despite stepping down as CEO in 2015, Lauren remains a powerful voice in the company, as executive chairman and chief creative officer. Lauren seems quite fond of Central Park, celebrating the company’s 40th anniversary there as well, at the Conservatory Garden. Now 10 years later, he will use his half-century milestone, his victory lap if you will, to help preserve Central Park and all its cherished history.


Angel_of_the_Waters_Fountain_and_Bethesda_Terrace,_Central_Park,_NYC
Bethesda Fountain

The Bethesda Fountain, is the focal point of the Bethesda Terrace, and is one of the largest fountains in New York City, measuring twenty-six feet high by ninety-six feet wide.

It is the only sculpture to have been commissioned as a part of Central Park's original design.
Known as Angel of the Waters, the neoclassical fountain features an eight-foot bronze angel who stands above four small cherubim representing health, purity, temperance, and peace. The angel herself carries a lily in one hand while the other remains outstretched, poised in the action of delivering a blessing on the water pouring from around her feet and into the basin at the bottom of the fountain. This is to commemorate the 1842 opening of the Croton Aqueduct, which supplied New York City with fresh water.

Angel of the Waters was designed by Emma Stebbins in 1868 and dedicated in 1873, at which point Stebbins became the first woman to receive commission for a major work of art in the city of New York. Stebbins linked the new, pure city water flowing from the fountain to the healing powers of the biblical pool, and quoted John 5:2-4 at the statue's dedication, saying:
"Now there is at Jerusalem by the sheep market a pool, which is called... Bethesda... whoever then first after the troubling of the waters stepped in was made whole of whatsoever disease he had."

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Annotated Guide To Men's Belts

The Complete Guide To Men’s BeltsArticle By  on 11th March 2014 | @gabrielweil

IMAGE: AUSTIN REED SS14

Stay Hungry. Stay Foolish.

Nine years and 19 million YouTube views later, Steve Jobs's commencement address to Stanford University's graduating class of 2005 has achieved iconic status. Jobs, the Apple visionary who died in 2011 at age 56, delivered a speech that resonated far beyond the Stanford audience, with a masterful mix of personal anecdotes, sparks of insight and universally applicable pieces of wisdom. Each year, especially around graduation season, people discover and rediscover Jobs's speech and its messages for those who seek meaning and purpose in life and at work. - Carolyn Gregoire Note that Steve Jobs originally asked Screenwriter Aaron Sorkin to write this speech: Sorkin was not available.  - DJK Full text of Steve Jobs' commencement address to Stanford University 2005
"I am honored to be with you today at your commencement from one of the finest universities in the world. I never graduated from college. Truth be told, this is the closest I've ever gotten to a college gradu…

3D Printed Dinner & Neckwear

Dinner Is Printed By A. J. JACOBS - New York Times
THE hype over 3-D printing intensifies by the day. Will it save the world? Will it bring on the apocalypse, with millions manufacturing their own AK-47s? Or is it all an absurd hubbub about a machine that spits out chintzy plastic trinkets? I decided to investigate. My plan: I would immerse myself in the world of 3-D printing. I would live for a week using nothing but 3-D-printed objects — toothbrushes, furniture, bicycles, vitamin pills — in order to judge the technology’s potential and pitfalls.
I approached Hod Lipson, a Cornell engineering professor and one of the nation’s top 3-D printing experts, with my idea. He thought it sounded like a great project. It would cost me a mere $50,000 or so. Unless I was going to 3-D print counterfeit FabergĂ© eggs for the black market, I’d need a Plan B. Which is how I settled on the idea of creating a 3-D-printed meal. I’d make 3-D-printed plates, forks, place mats, napkin rings, candlesticks —…