Skip to main content

Meet Adam Derry, the Man Putting Tech into Gucci Suits



Wearable technology is the future, I think we can all agree on that. Adam Derry was the mastermind behind will.i.am’s fully functional cellular Gucci suit at this year’s Met Gala. The suit had the capabilities to text, call, play music, and many more features that you wouldn’t believe. The hanger worked as a charger, giving a whole new meaning to “charged up.”
Adam started his creative brand development agency, ADBD, back in 2007. His numerous successful projects caught the eye of will.i.am, and by the end of 2012, he began to act as creative director to the Black Eyed Peas star. He is now a pioneer in the fashion world, pushing culture forward every day.

(c) Jason Fitter for Complex, June 22, 2016

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Annotated Guide To Men's Belts

The Complete Guide To Men’s BeltsArticle By  on 11th March 2014 | @gabrielweil

IMAGE: AUSTIN REED SS14

Warning, Car Porn

The signature feature is the Rolls Royce Wraith’s Starlight Headliner, consisting of 1,340 LEDs hand-sewn to create an effect of owning one’s personal night sky filled with stars...

Warning, content below represents a man's libidinous fascination with an automobile. It is not Lolita; after all Bradley Berman, the author, is not Nabokov and the Wraith is not underaged. Nonetheless, I find myself simultaneously repulsed... and seduced. David J. Katz

3D Printed Dinner & Neckwear

Dinner Is Printed By A. J. JACOBS - New York Times
THE hype over 3-D printing intensifies by the day. Will it save the world? Will it bring on the apocalypse, with millions manufacturing their own AK-47s? Or is it all an absurd hubbub about a machine that spits out chintzy plastic trinkets? I decided to investigate. My plan: I would immerse myself in the world of 3-D printing. I would live for a week using nothing but 3-D-printed objects — toothbrushes, furniture, bicycles, vitamin pills — in order to judge the technology’s potential and pitfalls.
I approached Hod Lipson, a Cornell engineering professor and one of the nation’s top 3-D printing experts, with my idea. He thought it sounded like a great project. It would cost me a mere $50,000 or so. Unless I was going to 3-D print counterfeit Fabergé eggs for the black market, I’d need a Plan B. Which is how I settled on the idea of creating a 3-D-printed meal. I’d make 3-D-printed plates, forks, place mats, napkin rings, candlesticks —…