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Having It All: Fashion & Sustainability




As a global community, we’re becoming increasingly concerned about the impact that our consumption has on the environment. But is it possible to be committed to social and environmental ideals and still love fashion? That’s the question Nadine Farang asks herself in this introspective read, and the answer is yes.
You shouldn't have to choose between your ideals and your love of fashion. 

Nadine suggests that those that are fashion-obsessed but are equally concerned with social & environmental issues just like her can take efforts to making more thoughtful purchases. She also provides tips on how to get started. For example, one can slow down their relationship with "fast fashion". They can also purchase more elevated, timeless pieces and find a good tailor to maintain them instead of constantly buying new pieces.

Much of what Nadine discusses resonates with what Randa believes in; the importance of taking steps to positively impact our global community. We’ve been seeing a rise of consumer interest in items that are sustainable, handcrafted, and/or fair trade certified and are reacting to these needs. By partnering with companies like Mercado Global we’re on the path to advancing sustainable fashion in the future and purchasing with purpose.

This article is from Manrepeller.com

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