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One Day Sale, Your Choice, Only $9000

Have a Yen for Great Gifts? 

Japan’s premier department store has a spin on the classic “One Day Sale.” 
Mitsukoshi was founded in 1673 to sell artisanal Kimono. Rather than the traditional door-to-door selling of the time, Mitsukoshi opened a small storefront in Echigo Province.


Had you visited Nihonbashi, Isetan’s Mitsukoshi's  flagship department store, in downtown Tokyo on March 1st, 2016, you would have found everything offered at a single, and singular, price.  
Similar to a “99 cent store” concept, however all 125 items in the event were offered, "on sale" at 1 million Yen, or roughly $9,000, at current exchange rates.
You may purchase items including: his & hers silk Kimono, a crystal ball (I can already predict your future…), a century-old bonsai plant, a unique “Teddy Bear” by artist Karin De Lorenzo, a solid-gold lion, emeralds, rare coral, and more - they’re all $9,000, today only.
Door busters? Perhaps not. However, the products are regularly $15,000 each. Mitsukoshi expects a total sell-out. They are offering consumers an option to "draw lots" for the gifts of their choice.
Retailers, worldwide, strive to provide discerning consumers with unique in-store experiences.  Get in line.
(c) David J. Katz, 2016, New York City

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