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Big Thinkers, Go-Getters & Awesome Ideas

"This workspace has... big thinkers, go-getters, late nights & early mornings, awesome ideas, honest feedback, lots of coffee, challenges and conquerors, dream-chasers, mold-breakers & change makers."

by Helen Williams, available at Holstee.com.

Holstee’s founders, Dave, Mike and Fabian sat together on the steps of Union Square in New York to write down how they define success. The goal was to create something they could reflect back on if they ever felt stuck or found themselves living according to someone else’s definition of happiness.


In 2009, the words of the Holstee Manifesto took form in a bold letterpress poster with the help of designer, Rachael Beresh. Not long after it began to take the internet by storm, with the Washington Post calling it “The Next Just Do It”.





And, in 2010, they created the Lifecycle Video, below, as a homage to the Manifesto while celebrating the diversity of bicycle riding in New York City.




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