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Ad Campaign: Of the people, by the people, for the people


The Evolution of an Ad Campaign - MR Magazine - Karen Alberg Grossman

Countess Mara neckwear has a history of compelling advertising; Randa Accessories, owner of the brand, wants to ensure that the legacy lives on.

Explains Randa’s senior vice president of marketing, Richard Carroll, “I remember great old Countess Mara ads like ‘Be a Gentleman’ and ‘Tell a man you like his necktie and watch his personality unfold like a flower…’ We want to continue with ads that speak directly to the consumer, modernize them, make them relevant to today’s consumer and add some of the original fun and humor. We recognize that young guys are dressing up again, however neckwear purchasing is largely event- and occasion-driven, e.g. weddings, graduation, proms, holiday parties… So our new campaign is designed to position Countess Mara accessories as ideal “for every occasion;” our goal is to celebrate and share moments in people’s lives. So much of men’s advertising today is aspirational; our ads are about real people, our ads are not staged. We’re saying ‘your life is beautiful, just the way it is…’”

The campaign has been running regularly in print media including The New York Times magazine, and aggressively on social media platforms including facebook, twitter, instagram and pintrest. The best part: these fabulous photos of ordinary guys in Countess Mara ties are not necessarily professional shots: many are submitted to Countess Mara’s websites and social media pages by regular guys and the best images are selected by the marketing team at Randa for inclusion in the national print ad campaign. “The ads provide photos credits for the subjects, their occasion and the photographer,” says Carroll. “The best part for me is when I call people to inform them that their photo’s been chosen for an ad. Their reactions have been truly heart-warming.”












Among Carroll’s favorite shots: the newest ad (breaking this Sunday in the New York Times Magazine) featuring a “selfie” by Oswaldo Perez. It’s a cool photo (check out the reflection in his sunglasses), the guy’s clearly got style, plus he owns a closet full of Countess Mara neckties…

From the Countess Mara web site, “We built this site because feeling confident when you walk out the door could be the start of a very special occasion – and we don’t want to miss it.”


I love this campaign and look forward to more of these fabulous photos!

http://www.mrketplace.com/76438/the-evolution-of-an-ad-campaign/


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