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This Belt Can Charge Your Phone


Nifty, a technology start-up based in the United Kingdom, is teaming up with clothing designers Casely-Hayford to craft a fashionable belt that will double as a mobile charger. 
The XOO Belt is made with full-grain Italian leather and will come in multiple styles. Nifty's crowdfunding project on Indiegogo has reached nearly 80 percent of its $39,096 funding goal.
"It looks, feels and weighs about the same as a really nice belt … but comes with a mighty 2,100 milliampere-hours of hidden charge and can charge pretty much any device," the creators said. Each buckle contains two charging points. 
The creators are a father and son who have designed clothes worn by well-known figures, including actor Robert Downey Jr. and R&B singer Drake, according to their Indiegogo profile.

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