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A SHIRT MAKER’S TAKE ON BOW TIES AND SHIRTS



2-button turn back cuff
Vanoli Bespoke Jag Point Shirt
Jag Point Shirt
The Aficionado is pleased to welcome Paul Vanoli, who runs Vanoli Bespokein London, England, as a guest blogger.
The Bow Tie… It’s the Marmite of the tie world, love them or hate them. Bow ties are the more quirky, fun and colourful little brother of the tie, which in my view better reflect our personality. I love the bow tie when worn with the correct collar style but equally when worn with a large clunky long pointed collar I can’t stand them!
Vanoli Bespoke Rounded Short Point Shirt
Rounded Short Point Shirt
As a shirt maker I believe the bow tie can only really be worn with three collar styles – jag point collar, short point and rounded short point. Ideally the chosen shirt should have a lower cut band as the bow tie gives it has a little more height. The lower band makes the neck look longer giving you a more elegant profile.
Of course another thing to consider is that when you wear a bow tie is that the placket of your shirt will be on show. I am a fan of the traditional British placket construction as it stops the shirt from twisting.
2 Button Turnback Shirt
Button Turnback Shirt
But when wearing a bow tie this can look a little formal and unadventurous. A flat fronted placket is by far the better choice, giving a cleaner more avant-garde look.
So to date we have a lower cut band shirt with a choice of three short point collars and a flat front. When it comes to cuffs let’s dress it up a little with my personal favorite a two button-turnback cuff. Lets keep the shirt fairly plain and let the bow tie do the talking.
So next time you pull out your favorite bow tie ensure that your shirt is considered carefully to ensure it compliments your look wholeheartedly.
Disclosure:  Randa Accessories is the largest producer of bow ties in world.  DJK
Paul Vanoli has been working at the highest end of menswear for over 20 years. Starting his retail career at Gieves & Hawkes in Savile Row he subsequently went onto continue his education with Turnbull & Asser in Jermyn Street before moving to New York to establish the T&A brand in the USA. More recently he set up the bespoke shirt department for Kilgour in Savile Row running frequent Trunk-shows all over the world before branching out on his own with Vanoli Bespoke.

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