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Randa Como X 2

Randa Doubles in Size Its Como, Italy Design Center
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE New York, NY (October 8, 2013) – Randa Accessories announces the expansion of their Como, Italy Design Center doubling it in size and scope and increasing its investment in, and commitment to, its neckwear business. The new larger offices now house additional staff and include archives of over 100,000 designs dating to 1910.



Opened on May 16, 1985 with a single employee, Randa’s Italy Design Center currently employs twenty full-time associates and acts as the international design hub for the global company. Neckwear designers, merchants, trend analysts, planners, sales and marketing teams from Randa’s offices in twelve countries use this facility as their muse and home away from home. The Design Center’s strategic location in Como, Italy comes with the weight of history and the special artistry that is ingrained in the Italian DNA.

Rita Palotti, Managing Director of Randa International, SRL describes, “Color and pattern design are in our culture, what our artisans know from a very young age. We are schooled in it at the “Setificio” and the Italian government supports artisan industries.”

Como sits at the easily accessed southern end of Lake Como where the surrounding hills have been inhabited since the Bronze Age. Randa’s artisans continue their regional heritage as “masters of silk” dating back to Ancient Rome and the famous Silk Road. That history of silk and manufacturing serves Randa well, delivering direct relationships with Italian mills and accompanying speed-to-market, as well as constant fashion innovation. Most important, The Randa Como Design Center provides the singular artistry that is “Made in Italy.”



“How Italians finish it, color it,” says John Kammeier, Randa’s SVP Neckwear, “is like nowhere else. Their artisans’ understanding of color and construction is hands down the best.” This also allows Randa product innovation in the neckwear classification unlike any competitor. “We are almost 90% vertical so speed-to-market  is our forté,” says Kammeier, “but our ability to create customized proprietary fabrics and designs, even matching a warp thread to a shirt color, is what makes Randa unique.” 

Randa’s Design Center creates over 10,000 unique neckwear designs each year. To that end, Randa has increased its investment in modern technology infused with traditional craftsmanship. The facility digitally prints tie designs directly on silk as immediate sample yardage and electronically transmits extremely high resolution designs to their mills and factories for full production. These advanced techniques allow the Randa Design Center to have as many as 80 different warps working at the same time, more than any other company in the industry, and provide for unprecedented speed-to-market in an industry where success depends on fast fashion and daily optimization. This core competency is aided by forecasting and planning teams on five continents and 3,700 in-store merchandisers at 18,000 points of sale.

Randa Accessories is currently digitizing their entire 103-year old archive of neckwear designs, including collections acquired from premier storied silk houses. This will allow for instant global access to a treasure trove of patterns and inspiration.
Randa recognizes the attributes, history, and perhaps greatest of all, cultural and artistic talents of this area of Italy and their unique benefit to Randa and its partners.
Randa continues to hone its strengths, leverage its competitive advantages and invest in its growing neckwear business. The Como Design Center is a microcosm of Randa Accessories on the larger scale and one reason why Randa has produced nearly 2 billion ties over its 103 year history and will, this year alone, produce over 2 million bow ties - more than all other companies combined. 



About Randa Accessories
Randa Accessories is the global leader in lifestyle accessories and the world’s largest men’s accessories company. Collaborating with 75 leading brands, Randa designs, reinvents, manufactures, and markets men’s belts, wallets, neckwear, small leather goods, luggage, backpacks, business cases, seasonal footwear, jewelry, and gifts. From its origins as a neckwear company over a century ago, Randa today sells more bow ties than the rest of the industry combined and now provides fashion, lifestyle, luxury, and private branded products through retailers in all channels of distribution, worldwide.  More information is available at www.randa.net.

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