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John Lobb Launches Ties and Gloves

'DETAILS ARE SO IMPORTANT at John Lobb," said Renaud Paul-Dauphin, chief executive of the 164-year-old company that makes some of the most beautiful and understated men's shoes around. That's not surprising: The brand's focus is accessories, a category that's all about finessing a look's main attractions. 

Details certainly distinguish the new gloves and ties that just arrived in John Lobb stores world-wide and online. Much consideration, for instance, went into the tie's wider 120-degree angle tip, which Mr. Paul-Dauphin described as "not too classical, but not too designer," and its calfskin griffe, the label-bearing loop on the back into which you tuck the skinny end. Maintaining a cohesive through-line with the footwear is also important. The gloves are made of calfskin, like the shoes, instead of the usual lambskin, to "use our savoir faire," said Mr. Paul-Dauphin. The buckles are identical to those used on Lobb's well-known monkstrap shoe. Each pair consists of two parts: a cashmere-and-silk inner glove and a leather outer glove. "It's like a sock in a shoe," said Mr. Paul-Dauphin. "That's a bit of storytelling, but it really is true."
—Meenal Mistry

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