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I designed this...

...no WE designed this!

Imagining what is next for Poetry
A year ago my wife Anneli and I, set out with a goal to give poetry mobility and make it fun to write with friends.  We aim to help engage young communities to spend time with creative writing, and what better way than with a mobile app.  Tap our app and create your own Poetry Slam with friends.  Share poems to your public book for others to rate.  Each day we feature the Poem with the highest points.  Press play and receive 3 random words that you can choose to write solo or a create a multi-player Poetry Slam.  With social media it is easier than ever to get the recognition you deserve as a poet.  Share your poems with the world via Facebook, Twitter or more intimately through SMS.

Poetry, it serves our innate need to explain ourselves and the world we live in.  The words we string together into poems articulate and frame experiences.  Poetry is a resource that leads you to unlock your imagination, plus it will help to improve your cognitive function.  Give the gift of poetry Today! - It lasts a Lifetime.

Invite your friends from Facebook and start tweeting Poetry!

The last video game I designed was in the year 2000 as a CAM (Computer Animation / Multimedia) student studying at the Art Institute of Dallas.  It's main function was to teach kids about planets as they traveled in spaceship through the solar system.  Long lapses of time have a tendency to build an itch.  For me it was this itch, and the longing desire to contribute in Anneli's poetry blog (Estonian language only).  I would watch her spend countless hours manually taking emails and cutting and pasting poems to her poetry blog.  I always said their must be an easier way, and I always said you should make both your cooking and poetry blogs in english.  So many of us would follow your cooking and read your poetry.   These feelings eventually played in my mind as a soundtrack, as I played games like Farmville and Draw Something.  We can build an App!  and we did.
Here is a look at my public book




















David, thanks for giving me this voice, Imaging what is next!

Rhymes with Friends Download on iTunes


Join our Poetic Social Network today!

Poetically yours,
Brian Tedesco
AKA my Alias @Rhymes3D

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