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Best Made Co.

A continuous lean



I’ve been meaning to go and see the Best Made Co. offices for at least the past two years. Communication flew back and forth, I just never seemed to make it over there, and not for lack of desire to check it out. Further confusing the whole situation was the fact that I basically walked by the place on my daily walk for years. I have no excuses. Well, it now seems that my procrastination has paid off, because by the time I found myself on White Street in NYC the studio had morphed into the first full-blown Best Made Co. shop that opens its doors today.
Housed in a quintessentially skylighted TriBeCa space —which was previously used by it’s former tenant for crafting fine art— the handsome well-designed nook of outdoorsy-ness occupies most of the space with a new loft and catwalk in the back that will still serve as the Best Made Co. offices. The front of the store is open to the public during the week, with a larger offering opening up for the weekends. The store offers everything that’s available on the e-commerce shop including a strong selection of painted axes (which judging from my Instagram can be quite polarizing), theLightweight Cruiser, mugs, prints, knives and all sorts of other interesting stuff. And the brand doesn’t wholesale, so if you want it you have to order from them directly online or stop by this new outpost.
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At the new shop, everything is beautifully designed and aesthetically pleasing regardless of your level interest in the outdoors. At its core, Best Made Co. is a celebration of good design and utility in its purist form.
There’s an optimistic spirit of adventure and inclusiveness built-in to the shop and the brand. You can feel it when you visit and also when you talk to brand founder Peter Buchanan-Smith. To me it’s seems increasingly rare that you encounter positiveness like this. Read the comments on myInstagram from last night and you’ll notice that it isn’t always an inclusive and response back. So many seem to want to take things away from people simply because they feel differently about how others approach a shared interest. “I’m into the outdoors and I don’t like your expensive axes so you aren’t a real outdoors-man.” That’s what I am hearing. I feel similar negative vibes coming from those that are into cycling about what you ride and what you wear. There are so many opinions and so much pressure to conform. It’s bullshit. Dress how you want to dress, wear what you want to wear and ride what you want to ride. Live and let live. Don’t pressure others to conform, it just makes you look insecure. You should be happy that people actually choose to get outside and do things that they enjoy. Happiness is not a zero sum game.
Like they say at Best Made: Be Positive.
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