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Vuitton Twitter Love Poems


Louis Vuitton flaunts women’s, men’s accessories via Twitter love poems
Posted By Tricia Carr On February 7, 2013 @ 5:00 am In Apparel and accessories,Featured,Industry sectors,Internet,News | No Comments
[1]
Louis Vuitton Mini Icon Alma BB bag

French label Louis Vuitton is joining the social marketing efforts for its women’s Mini Icons handbag collection and new men’s accessories through a love poem Twitter campaign.

Items in the women’s Mini Mon Amour and men’s Gallant Love collections will converse via Twitter by writing mini love poems to each other. Louis Vuitton is using hashtags #MiniMonAmour, #GallantLove and #LVLove and linking to the respective commerce-enabled accessories sections of its Web site.

“Social media is inherently social, and people want to interact with people online – not corporate logos,” said Christine Kirk, CEO of Social Muse Communications[2], Los Angeles. “Louis Vuitton is being inventive and creative by essentially giving their handbags a personality.

“As such, by reading each bag’s love note, consumers can identify themselves with one of the handbags based on personality type,” she said. “Overall, this helps makes Louis Vuitton seem like an approachable brand, rather than just being aspirational.

“Twitter is an excellent platform for sending out short bursts of information, or revealing snippets of a personality.”

Ms. Kirk is not affiliated with Louis Vuitton, but agreed to comment as an industry expert.
Louis Vuitton [3] did not respond before press deadline.

Love at first tweetLouis Vuitton began its Twitter love poem campaign by posting, “Attraction between the updated mini Monceau BB and the mighty Damier Keepall. Find #LVLove athttp://vuitton.lv/usMiniLove [4].”
The tweet included an image of the Monceau BB Mini Icons bag with the men’s Damier Keepall bag as well as a link to shop the Mini Icons collection.

Tweet 

Two more tweets that same day featured poems from one collection to the other.
A poem from the Gallant Love collection said, “#MiniMonAmour Monceaux, you disarm me in a charming way, blushing rose I hope you’re here to stay.”

The label included a link to purchase the Monceau BB bag for $1,610 as well as an image of the bag in green olive.

 [5]
Tweet 

Also, the Mini Mon Amor collection tweeted, “Oh #GalantLove Keepall! Of the many things you carry, you hold my heart.”

This tweet linked to purchase the Keepall 45 Bandoulière men’s travel bag for $1,500.
The campaign started up again Feb. 6 when Louis Vuitton tweeted,” The classic #LouisVuitton Porte-Document and fresh Alma BB find romance. Find your #LVLove at http://vuitton.lv/usMiniLove [4].”

 [6]
Tweet nothings

Subsequently, a tweet was posted from Gallant Love that said, “Like a velvet rose perfuming the air, thoughts of my #MiniMonAmour Alma BB are forever there.”

Another tweet from Mini Mon Amour said, “So sophisticated and chic, my #GallantLove Porte-Document Voyage my heart is yours to keep!”

These tweets featured the women’s Alma BB mini bag for $1,400 and the men’s Porte-Documents Voyage bag for $1,830.

 [7]
Tweet 

The campaign will continue for the next couple of weeks. Items that will be featured include watches, bags, wallets, jewelry and iPhone cases.

“Twitter is a major communication channel, and at this point there is no question whether it’s right for a brand or not,” said Yuli Ziv, founder/CEO of Style Coalition[8], New York. “It’s more about how to use it more effectively and in line with brand’s digital persona.

“Unlike other brands, Louis Vuitton doesn’t use it in a conversational way, but more as a broadcast channel,” she said. “Considering this fact, it is impressive they have built such a large following.
“Incorporating poems into the tweets could be a nice and unexpected way to engage with this audience.”

Size matters

Louis Vuitton is presently pushing its Mini Icons collection through a video campaign as well.
The French fashion house is showing off the collection in an upbeat social video that depicts the handbags in use by stylish women during springtime in Paris.
The “Small Is Beautiful” video quickly flashes between many scenes. Some scenes show women enjoying themselves during a spring afternoon, while others show animations, graphics and handbags arranged in deliberate shapes.

The label is sharing the 90-second video across its social channels and Web site to stir up interest for the set of small, brightly-colored bags (see story [9]).

Louis Vuitton is linking to the Mini Icons shopping experience through both campaigns.
Visitors to its Web site can click from the homepage to a checkerboard-like grid that shows images similar to those in the video and links to shop the collection in its squares.

Mini Icons site 

When consumers hold their cursor over each image square it becomes animated.
Consumers click certain squares to view the social video on Louis Vuitton’s Web site, view the entire Mini Icons line on another checkerboard and view images from the video.

The label will certainly add to the video efforts in creating a personality for the products, per Ms. Ziv.
“Louis Vuitton is known for evoking emotions in their campaigns and this plays well with the brand’s overall perception,” Ms. Ziv said.

“It is strategically timed to the Valentine’s Day when people talk about love, and poetry is a nice way to take these conversations to the next, more aspirational level,” she said.
“However, when it comes to the content itself, I was hoping to see more sophisticated rhymes from a luxury brand.”

Final Take

Tricia Carr, editorial assistant on Luxury Daily, New York

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