Friday, October 26, 2012

Hermes Scarf


Hermes Movie


Hermès targets new generation of silk scarf-buyers via short film


French label Hermès is using the spontaneity of young love to market its silk scarves to a new generation of aspirational consumers through a social film produced by 18-year-old photographer Olivia Bee.
The brand is likely extending the appeal of its iconic scarves to the younger generations in its three-minute film called “Il Est Pour Nous,” translating to “It is for Us” in English. Luxury marketers that have traditionally targeted true affluent consumers may want to use video to reach new, younger consumers, since the medium gives them the chance to tell a precise brand story.
“Hermès will reach the younger, 20- or 30-something customer who aspires to purchase luxury items from Hermès, and a younger, predominately female customer who is looking to add splashes of color to her wardrobe, accessories and home items,” said John Casey, founder of Freshfluff, New York.
“Engaging a younger director helps ensure that the video will appeal to a younger audience, particularly a female who would aspire to having such a fun and eventful first date and is seeing it through the vision and lens of a peer,” he said.
“The video is lively, fresh and very colorful, which is a reflection of youth and the Hermès brand.”
Mr. Casey is not affiliated with Hermès, but agreed to comment as an industry expert.
Hermès did not respond before press deadline.
Young and in loveHermès’ video contains elements such as quirky characters, a pop-art color scheme and vintage props that could help young, alternative consumers relate to the brand.
Il Est Pour Nous begins with a young man who is driving a red vintage convertible in a residential neighborhood. He passes a few houses that are painted light pink and blue.
Video still 
The young man then stops at a young girl’s house and gestures to her to come out to meet him.
The characters shake hands and stare down at the ground. They are presumably going on a first date.
Each character wears a Hermès scarf tied at the neck.
The date takes place in a forest. First, the characters run until they find a lake, removing their scarves before jumping into the water.
When it begins to get dark, the characters get out of the water and replace their scarves.
Next, the couple finds a picnic area in the woods that is set up under a pink canopy. It contains a couch, picnic blanket, tea set, bright spray-painted bunnies and vintage knickknacks as well as Hermès scarves draped over lines that run from tree-to-tree.
Hermès scarves 
The characters drink pink tea and eat cupcakes. They end the date with a kiss while holding the colored rabbits.
Il Est Pour Nous video
Film fanaticsHermès is one of many luxury marketers using social films to raise brand awareness on the digital platform.
But the label seems to use video sparsely in comparison to other brands. This could strengthen its current social video effort as well as future efforts since consumers might appreciate brand films that are few and far between.
Furthermore, video is often used by luxury marketers to complement existing advertising campaigns, but Hermès seems to be presenting the video on its own.
Some other luxury brands are using video to branch out from existing campaigns.
For example, Louis Vuitton uses video to push its heritage at times.
For instance, the label is currently bringing attention to the history of its classic monogram pattern in an online video series that depicts well-known personalities discussing their experiences with the print (see story).
Also, Louis Vuitton showcased its classic board game case covered in the signature Damier checkerboard pattern in a 60-second animated film that the label presented in June to its online magazine subscribers and social media fans (see story).
Meanwhile, Dolce & Gabbana also appealed to aspirational consumers’ love for vintage fashion in a silent short film that showcased the Italian fashion label’s spring/summer 2012 Matt Silk eyewear collection.
The 90-second “Italian comedy” depicted two women arguing over which sunglasses to wear while driving a classic convertible (see story).
Hermès’s short film as well as those with seemingly like goals will probably help luxury marketers stand out to young consumers while subtly pushing products and brand heritage to their digital audience.
“The strategy is to engage the younger Hermès customer, predominately female, that relies on the Internet or social networks for information about, or now to be entertained and engaged by, their preferred brands,” Mr. Casey said.
“I think it strengthens the brand in terms of having it better relate to a younger demographic,” he said. “The film is a subtle way to promote the brand and its products, and does so in a clever, youthful and colorful way.”

Tuesday, October 23, 2012

Fixtures and Presentations





Neckties arranged in semi-sequence for an almost-black-and-white periodic table interpretation. A horizontal display observed in Giorgio Armani, the cubby-holed tray fits perfectly atop one of the stores tables. Even though nearly greyscale and without bright colors other clues, the traditional tie-like patterns communicate the wares across the store.

SEE THESE LINKS FOR MORE FIXTURE AND PRESENTATION CONCEPTS - DJK

Compare directly to a color version at…
Periodic Table of Neckties

For Necktie merchandising extremes SEE…
God’s Eye View of Neckties
PowerWing Sells Ties and Belts.”


For a visual Pinterest Board summary see…
Necktie Fixtures and Merchandising in Retail



For Pinterest Photo Board summaries see…
Trays of Wood in Retail
Trays Other-Than-Wood in Retail

Friday, October 19, 2012

Why Are Blueprints Blue?

http://gizmodo.com/5953073/why-are-blueprints-blue


If you ever wondered why blueprints were blue and not black or red or white or brown or any other color than blue, well, it's not because architects really like the color but because the technique in making blueprints caused the paper to turn blue.
Mental Floss delved into the history of blueprints and discovered that the blueprint process was developed in the 1800's when scientists found an easy way to reproduce documents by using ammonium iron citrate and potassium ferrocyanide as some sort of old school photocopy. How does that really work? Well, as Mental Floss explains it:
Someone creates a drawing on translucent tracing paper or cloth. The drawing is placed over a piece of blueprinting paper, which has been coated with a mix of ammonium iron citrate and potassium ferrocyanide from an aqueous solution and dried. When the two papers are exposed to a bright light, the two chemicals react to form an insoluble blue compound called blue ferric ferrocyanide (also known as Prussian Blue), except where the blueprinting paper was covered, and the light blocked, by the lines of the original drawing. After the paper is washed and dried to keep those lines from exposing, you're left with a negative image of white (or whatever color the blueprint paper originally was) against a dark blue background.
You see, the chemicals react and makes the paper blue. And back in the day, using this blueprinting technique was obviously faster and more effective than tracing the documents. The blueprint name has stuck ever since. The more you know, right. 



Retailers With Relationships



Bergdorf Goodman and Barneys New York were lauded by high-net-worth consumers for being the most effective at maintaining salesperson-to-customer relationships in comparison to other high-end retailers, according to a new report by the Luxury Institute.
The 2012 Luxury Customer Relationship Index survey of U.S. consumers found that while salesperson-to-customer relationships are neglected in the luxury sector overall, the categories that came out on top in terms of participants’ perception of these relationships include watches, jewelry and men’s ready-to-wear. Furthermore, 70 percent of those surveyed who interact with a specific salesperson said that this relationship causes them to spend more both in-store and online.
“The customer conversion and customer retention rates are very low right now in the luxury sector, so there is a huge opportunity to not only convert but retain customers, especially now with the slow global economy,” said Milton Pedraza, CEO of the Luxury Institute, New York. “There is a huge opportunity to cultivate relationships even through the hard times.”
The latest Luxury Customer Relationship Index surveyed consumers with at least $5 million in assets and $200,000 in annual income.


Monday, October 15, 2012

What's in your wallet?

https://vimeo.com/51369343


What's In Your Wallet? from David Katz on Vimeo.

Trafalgar Wallet + AMEX Card = Unusual Occurrence?


Evolution Of Savile Row



Introduction
Style. Classic style. For many of us, these are the first words that come into our heads when we think of Savile Row. Savile Row is steeped in tradition, that much is certain. Built between 1731 and 1735, according to many fashion critics, its aim was to provide the world’s best tailoring for the capital of England.

Of course, only the best was good enough for British gentleman, and as times and fashion trends have come and gone, the genius and resilience of tailors and cutters on Savile Row has seen them only produce garments that would bypass any era, watching the industry from afar with a mixture of amusement and confusion.

However, it seems the current resurgence of Savile Row is due in no small part to the blending of timeless style with the bold approach of fashion – along with all its controversial nuances that divides opinion and ensures that no one person dresses the same. Now, more than ever, we are seeing Savile Row mix bold colours, voluminous cuts and extraneous details into traditional tailored pieces that have been well established and accepted for generations.
Read more: http://www.fashionbeans.com/2012/the-evolution-of-savile-row/

Wednesday, October 10, 2012

Tuesday, October 9, 2012

Reflective Wingtips


Walking in the city can be rough — so outfit yourself properly with these Cole Haan Waterproof & Reflective Wingtips ($280-$330). Available in Cooper Square and LunarGrand styles, the waterproof versions are seam sealed to keep water out, while the reflective versions feature panels of light-refracting material in between smooth leather. No matter which you choose, you can count on a subtle grey colorway accented with striking splashes of pink.

Luggage, Stirred not Shaken




The Stabilist Aluminium case is inspired by the bespoke rifle case Globe-Trotter produced for the latest
James Bond film, SKYFALL, starring Daniel Craig.
Limited to just 100 editions globally, this case is one of the most exclusive products in Globe-Trotter’s history. This slim line 26″ aluminium suitcase has been formed by hand in England, and features a telescopic sight handle which is a replica of the one used in SKYFALL. Internally, the case is beautifully finished with a diamond quilted Alcantara lining and commemorative internal plaque.
This suitcase retails at £5,000 and is available now from the Globe -Trotter flagship Burlington Arcade store, and is also available to mail order. Please contact the store for more information or to place a mail order (click here)


Monday, October 8, 2012

25 Ways to Wear a Scarf in 4.5 Minutes!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5LYAEz777AU

Watch the Video

Priming your Creativity


Priming your Creativity

By Michael Michalko | Oct 04, 2012

Your creative thinking performance can be primed with certain images and pictures.


Experimental social psychologists have conducted numerous experiments that demonstrate how behavior and performance can be “primed” by showing participants certain objects and pictures. In one study, participants who were primed with pictures associated with business — such as briefcases, pens, pictures of people dressed in business clothes, commuter trains, and so on — became more competitive. The social psychologist Michael Slepian and colleagues at Tufts University noticed during a study on “bright ideas” that participants became more insightful and creative when they were primed with an exposed light bulb. 

In short, they found that even exposure to an illuminating light bulb primes creativity.

Primes have been reported to influence nearly every facet of social life. Yale University psychologist John Bargh  had college students unscramble sentences that, for one group, contained words related to stereotypes about the elderly, such as wrinkle and Florida. Upon finishing, participants who had read old age–related words took seconds longer to walk down an exit hallway than peers who had perused age-neutral words. In other experiments, cues about money and wealth nudged people to become more self-oriented and less helpful to others. And people holding hot cups of coffee were more apt to judge strangers as having warm personalities. 

John Bargh likens primes to whistles that only mental butlers can hear. Once roused by primes, these silent inner servants dutifully act on a person’s preexisting tendencies and preferences without making a conscious commotion. Many animals reflexively take appropriate actions in response to fleeting smells and sounds associated with predators or potential mates, suggesting an ancient evolutionary heritage for priming, Bargh says. People can pursue actions on their own initiative, but mental butlers strive to ease the burden on the conscious lord of the manor.
ZEITGEIST BOARD
One way to prime yourself for creativity is to generate an awareness of what you want to be or accomplish. You can do this by creating a “Zeitgeist Board.” Zeitgeist means a general awareness of your general psychological, intellectual, emotional and creative spirit. A Zeitgeist Board is a large poster board on which you paste images, sayings, articles, poems, and other items that you’ve collected from magazines and other sources. It’s simple. The idea is to surround yourself with images of your intention (what you want to create or who you want to become) and, in the process, to encourage your awareness and passion to grow. 

Lay your intention board on a surface where you can work on it, and try out this thought experiment:

THOUGHT EXPERIMENT.  Ask yourself what it is you want to be or to create. Maybe one word will be the answer. Maybe images will appear in your head or, perhaps, a picture best represents your intention. Post the word, image, or picture in the middle of your Zeitgeist Board.

Suppose you want to create a donut shop. Post the words “Donut Shop” or a picture in the center of the board. Now look through magazines and other sources and pull out pictures, poems, articles, or headlines that relate to donut shops and post them on the board. Or suppose you want to write a novel. Similarly post the words or a picture that represents writing a novel to you (e.g., a picture of Ernst Hemingway) and post items that relate to writing a novel on the board.

Have fun with it. Make a big pile of images, words, and phrases. Go through the pile and put favorites on the board. If you add new ones, eliminate those that no longer feel right. This is where intuition comes in. As you place the items on the board, you’ll get a sense how they should be laid out. For instance, you might want to assign a theme to each corner of the board, such as “What I have,” “What I will have,” “What I need,” and “How to get what I need.”

Hang the board on a wall and study and work on it every day. You’ll discover that the board will add clarity to your desires, and feeling to your visions, which in turn will generate an awareness of the things in your environment that can help you realize your vision. You will begin to see things that you did not see before, and, just as importantly, will become aware of the blanks and holes in your vision.

You can then become proactive and imagine the many different ways you can fill in the blanks. Imagine a person who is aware of all the colors except one particular shade of blue. Let all the different shades of blue, other than that one, be placed before him, and arranged in order from the deepest to the lightest shade of blue. He most probably will perceive a blank, where that one shade is missing, and will realize that the distance is greater between the contiguous colors than between any others. He will then imagine what this particular shade should look like, though he has never seen it. This would not be possible had he not seen all the different shades of blue.

My brother-in-law desired to be an artist. His Zeitgeist Board was a collage of pictures of paintings and artists, poetry about art, and articles about artists and their work. In the center of the board, he had a picture of Vincent Van Gogh’s self-portrait. Over time, he began to imagine conversing with his various prints of paintings. One print that particularly enthralled him was Vincent van Gogh’s Starry Night. He would focus on the painting and engage in an imaginary two-way conversation. The more he engaged with the painting, the more alive it seemed to become. He would ask the painting questions, such as: What inspired the artist to paint the picture? What was his knowledge of the world? What were his contemporaries’ views of the painting? How was the artist able to communicate over the centuries? What is the artist communicating? He would ask how the colors worked together, and ask questions about lines, shapes, and styles.

My brother-in-law, once a disgruntled government employee, is now a successful artist who has had several showings of his work. He created a psychological environment with his Zeitgeist Board that primed his subconscious mind which influenced him to change his role in the world and become the artist he wanted to be.

…………………………….
Michael Michalko is the author of the highly acclaimed Thinkertoys: A Handbook of Creative Thinking Techniques; Cracking Creativity: The Secrets of Creative Genius; ThinkPak: A Brainstorming Card Deck and Creative Thinkering: Putting Your Imagination to Work.
http://creativethinking.net/WP01_Home.htm

Wednesday, October 3, 2012

Chanel Handbag

Chanel - Spring/Summer 2013

Only Brown Belts




Founded in June 2011, by Kelvin Cheong, Only Brown is an online purveyor of men’s fine leather accessories.  Mr. Cheong distaste for the praise of black accessories led him to compile a collection of quality items from around the world in a myriad of shades of brown from dark to light and in between, and distribute them from his Singaporean headquarters.



I am proponent of brown, yes, even in town.

The number of brown shoes, belts, trousers and pretty much anything else you could think of outnumbers that of anything black in my collection.  Black is great for evening affairs of grandeur and gravitas, but it can be harsh and uninviting in most cases and has no life of its own.  Brown is the antithesis of black.  Brown comes in many hues and shades and carries a life of its own exclusive to the owner.  This is the only purveyor of fine leather accessories I’m aware of that is built solely on offering products in a certain color.

Recently I’ve had the fortunate of conversing with Kelvin about his offerings and philosophy on style and he very graciously offered to have me try one of his products.  Kelvin offers products small and large from travel accessories to lifestyle accoutrements.  At the time of our meeting I was fixated on acquiring another belt.  At the time I had just finished creating my first bespoke belt and was in the mood for another.  While I chose something subtle and somber in my last belt, this time I was in the mood for something more playful.  I decided on the brogue leather belt by Leyva.

Leyva is a Spanish owned and operated company founded 1960 by Antonio Leyva.  Leyva creates some of the most beautiful belts in the world and was recognized with the Alas award in 2008 for its track record of success.


Just coming off a bespoke purchase I was able to specify my own size belt.  This time I had to go back to standard sizing and was a bit hesitant about the fit.  However, the 32 turned out to be a bit snugger than my Hickey Freeman chocolate brown suede belt in the same size.  I can only imagine that the difference exists because of the epidemic of obesity in this country compared to our European counterparts.

The belt itself is fashioned in 100% cow hide with a matte polished brass buckle and the signature brogueing around the whole of the belt.  It also features a slight contrast stitch running lengthwise along the brogueing detail.  The leather is soft and supple and is elegantly stamped with the Leyva crest.

Upon receiving it the belt is beautifully packaged and presented with care and holds its true color compared to what is shown online.  My biggest concern other than the fit was if I had shoes to properly compliment the belt or vice versa.  The color is listed as ‘whiskey’ by but I would’ve called it butterscotch.  At least those are the color cap toe oxfords I wear with it.  It is most certainly a summer/warm weather belt choice.

I’d be hard pressed to reach for this in the winter when my suede or hard wearing bridle belt in burgundy would be better suited for flannels, tweeds, and Shetlands.  However, I did get a few good wears out of it with my linen trousers, pop over shirt and Italian driving loafers.  I’m sure this will be my belt of choice for many sunny days to come whether they are right here in DC or in some foreign playground of which the layman would not be able to pronounce the name.

Grant Harris is a Washington, DC based menswear specialist. He is owner & Chief Style Consultant at Image Granted, LLC. He owns many more pairs of socks than he should.

The 8 Most Valuable Luxury Brands


Louis Vuitton is by far the most valuable luxury brand in the world, worth $23.577 billiona 2 percent increase from last year's valueaccording to a new survey from brand consulting firm Interbrand.
It was a good year for the luxury conglomerate. The company improved its digital experience and launched several apps, entered the fragrance market for the first time, and remained a blockbuster brand in China.
It even got Michael Phelps to star in a steamy ad campaign.
In addition to Louis Vuitton, seven other luxury brands made it onto Interbrand's annual list of the world's most valuable brands. Most experienced major growth, and there were two newcomers to the list.
Interbrand takes into account brands' financial performance, role in influencing customer choice, and ability to command premium prices.

BRAND2012 RANK2011 RANK2012 BRAND VALUE ($millions)% CHANGE
Louis Vuitton1718$23,5772%
Gucci3839$9,4468%
Hermès6366$6,18215%
Cartier6870$5,49515%
Tiffany & Co.7073$5,15915%
Burberry8295$4,34216%
Prada84N/A$4,271NEW
Ralph Lauren91N/A$4,038
NEW


Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/the-8-most-valuable-luxury-brands-in-the-world-2012-10#ixzz28FpFrfry