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Fixtures and Presentations





Neckties arranged in semi-sequence for an almost-black-and-white periodic table interpretation. A horizontal display observed in Giorgio Armani, the cubby-holed tray fits perfectly atop one of the stores tables. Even though nearly greyscale and without bright colors other clues, the traditional tie-like patterns communicate the wares across the store.

SEE THESE LINKS FOR MORE FIXTURE AND PRESENTATION CONCEPTS - DJK

Compare directly to a color version at…
Periodic Table of Neckties

For Necktie merchandising extremes SEE…
God’s Eye View of Neckties
PowerWing Sells Ties and Belts.”


For a visual Pinterest Board summary see…
Necktie Fixtures and Merchandising in Retail



For Pinterest Photo Board summaries see…
Trays of Wood in Retail
Trays Other-Than-Wood in Retail

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