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Evolution Of Savile Row



Introduction
Style. Classic style. For many of us, these are the first words that come into our heads when we think of Savile Row. Savile Row is steeped in tradition, that much is certain. Built between 1731 and 1735, according to many fashion critics, its aim was to provide the world’s best tailoring for the capital of England.

Of course, only the best was good enough for British gentleman, and as times and fashion trends have come and gone, the genius and resilience of tailors and cutters on Savile Row has seen them only produce garments that would bypass any era, watching the industry from afar with a mixture of amusement and confusion.

However, it seems the current resurgence of Savile Row is due in no small part to the blending of timeless style with the bold approach of fashion – along with all its controversial nuances that divides opinion and ensures that no one person dresses the same. Now, more than ever, we are seeing Savile Row mix bold colours, voluminous cuts and extraneous details into traditional tailored pieces that have been well established and accepted for generations.
Read more: http://www.fashionbeans.com/2012/the-evolution-of-savile-row/

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