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Tent of the Future


Sierra Designs has a tent from the future


by Edwin - on July 29th, 2012

Do you love camping? Well, if you have not given camping a go before in the past, you might want to consider taking your family out for a camping trip to the great outdoors while the summer season is still in vogue. Now, there are plenty of companies out there making tents, but here we are with Sierra Designs – a company that has just announced that they have released a spanking new tent for you and the rest of your pack to seek shelter from the elements while you enjoy nature’s bounty.

Sierra Designs’ latest addition will be part of the new line of ExoFusion fast-and-light tents, where it is called the new Mojo UFO. The name itself suggests that it is out of this world, and if you were to read on, I guess you can also come to the same epic conclusion that this tent is truly heads and shoulders above the rest. It is capable of housing two people for a good night’s rest inside, and even more amazingly, the entire shebang tips the scales at under 2 lbs. (0.9 kg), and can be pitched within minutes. I guess the drawback would be the price – as it is said to cost as much as a vacation for two, but think of it as a long term investment.

According to Sierra Designs, “For those who are truly obsessed with ultralight gear, space-age materials, and technical designs, we offer the Mojo UFO.” This particular tent can be said to be a pièce de résistance of modern tent technology and design. It will ditch standard nylon and polyester, but will instead rely on cuben fiber, an ultralight, highly durable fabric that often sees action in sailcloth, and it forms the tent’s body and integrated rain fly. Cuben fiber is getting more and more popular for the outdoors market, so you know that you are on the right track here.

The asking price? Like I mentioned earlier, this is not going to be cheap at $1,799 for the Mojo UFO. Any takers?

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