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Music to Cook By



In a world of extreme visual stimulation, pure audio still has the power to inform and inspire. The dining reporter Jeff Gordinier recently interviewed a handful of New York City chefs who depend on music as such a pivotal part of their creative process that they would feel adrift in the kitchen without it. As part of the reporting process, The Times asked 10 culinary creators to give us five songs they couldn’t cook without. Multimedia producer Jacky Myint created a simple and elegant page to house their playlists and to allow users to sample the music. http://nyti.ms/IEzJAF. And for the more visually inclined, multimedia producer Catherine Spangler produced a nice piece of video of some of the chefs in action and the music that keeps them moving. http://nyti.ms/I54uzJ 

NY Times Music List for Cooks

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